Six Books Every Entrepreneur Should Read

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One thing you should never stop doing as an entrepreneur is learning. As they say, knowledge is power! While you are likely to be a bit short on time, fitting in a few hours here and there to read a book comes highly recommended, especially when it is for the benefit of your business. If you don’t know where to start, read on to discover some of the best books for entrepreneurs.

“Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World” – Cal Newport

This is an incredibly interesting read that has been put together by the blog author of Study Hacks and Georgetown professor, Cal Newport. In this book, Cal turns the idea of talent on its head. He looks at why it is becoming increasingly rare to focus without distraction, and why this is so cognitively demanding. He likens deep work to a super power, and enlightens us to the right hacks to put in place to enable us to achieve this power.

Marketing: A Love Store, How to Matter to Your Customers – Bernadette Jiwa

Don’t let the “love story” distract you from the most important part of the title – “how to matter to your customers.” If you are looking to improve your marketing strategy, this is a must-read. It focuses on building the emotional connection that is required to matter to your customers. The book is adapted from a series of blog posts, and so it does not have a lot of structure. However, it does not really matter, as the material is so engaging and fresh. If you combine this with a marketing strategy template, you will be good to go. Get all the info here at theprauthority.com regarding marketing templates. This involves listing your goals, explaining your research, explaining your strategy, defining KPIs, listing tactical plans, and building a good team.

Cold Hard Truth on Men, Women, and Money – Kevin O’Leary

Who better to learn about money from than Mr. Wonderful from the Shark Tank? If you don’t know who Kevin O’Leary is, you can find out more about the Canadian-Irish businessman here. This may be a guide on money management, but don’t expect it to be dull and difficult to follow. In fact, it is quite the opposite. The easy-to-read, fast-paced book breaks down challenging financial concepts into their simplest form. If you want to provide yourself with financial freedom by growing your business, (and let’s face it, who doesn’t?), this book comes highly recommended.

Very Good Lives: The Fringe Benefits of Failure and the Importance of Imagination – J. K. Rowling

If you are a bit of a reading buff, but you have struggled to keep up the hobby while starting your business, this book is the perfect way to continue your passion for reading. In this story, J. K. Rowling uses a speech she once gave at Harvard University, as well as drawing inspiration from her own successes and failures. You will love the way she explains how critically important imagination is, as well as the benefits of failure. If you are facing the grim realities of failing and being broke, this book could quite literally change your life, and that is no exaggeration. Perseverance is what it is all about. Even if you are feeling hopeless and relying on benefits, you can still turn that into an incredible idea, and this book reveals how.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People – Stephen R. Covey

This is one of those books that you should not only read once. You should read it again and again. It is undoubtedly one of the best business books of all time. Covey provides self-aware yet actionable guidance for aspiring leaders who want to lead by example. If you are seeking ways to improve yourself, this book is the perfect starting point.

Good to Great – Jim Collins

This book tackles a problem that a lot of entrepreneurs experience. I have a good, steady business, but how do I turn it into a great business? This book has the answers, and it has been created based on an abundance of research. In fact, Collins deployed a research team made up of 21 people to go through all Fortune 500 businesses that met their scrupulous criteria. This meant businesses that have suffered stagnant profits followed by years of increasing profits and success. He analyzed these businesses, using them as case studies for the book so that he could show his readers how to go from good to great and surpass the competition.

 

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